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John S Stuart user not visiting Queenzone.com
John S Stuart
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Posted: 27 Apr 08, 09:12 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

Having a bit of trouble with electrical retailers 'Comet'.

My 9-month old 'Acer' PC had internal power supply problems which fried the motherboard. By law, my 12-month warranty guarantees replacement, refund or repair.

I know that the repair option is too expensive, and that it is cheaper to replace.
The problem is that in doing so, I would lose
my current hard-drive - as a replacement means just that - exchanging my faulty machine for a new one.

Before return, I took my faulty PC to a local professional computer company to personally pay to
1: have my drive cloned (So I would not lose any existing data)
and 2: (In the light of identity theft) wipe the existing hard-drive.

However, 'Comet' (the retailer) are bouncing me back to Acer (the manufacturer), and 'Acer'
are bouncing me back to Comet.

Because the warranty seal at the back of the machine has been broken (by a professional PC service) - they are both denying responsibility - even though it was recommended to me that a professional should clone and wipe, and I have the receipt to prove this.

I do not see cloning and wiping a hard-drive before return to a store for exchange as an unreasonable request.

What do you guys think?
Should I still get my PC exchanged because it is only 9-months old, or is it me that is in the wrong here?

Apparently my statutory rights are not affected, but what good is this if I am left with a faulty non-working PC?


"Listen to them. Children of the night. What music they make."
YourValentine user not visiting Queenzone.com
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YourValentine
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Posted: 27 Apr 08, 09:35 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

In my country you lose every warranty if you have the PC opened before returning it as a warranty case. It would have been wiser to discuss the issue with the retailer and get an agreement about removing the hard drive. As it is, it's probably the best to let a local expert repair the PC and forget about the warranty.

Of course you might try to get a customer friendly exception of the rule from your retailer. I have obtained that when the warranty expired just 2 weeks before the machine broke by suggesting I would notify consumer protection, the TV and the biggest newspaper :) I think they just wanted me to disappear from their service point:)


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Adolfo and the spiders from Mercury user not visiting Queenzone.com
Adolfo and the spiders from Mercury
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Posted: 02 May 08, 19:22 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

u should have broken the warranty label, if a professional had to break it, it should have been someone from the warranty, not just anyone
I think ur screwed


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Music Man user not visiting Queenzone.com

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Posted: 04 May 08, 16:29 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

I agree, if anyone breaks the warranty seal with your permission, but without the permission of the provider of the warranty, then your only hope is that they want your business in the future.


Creativity can always cover for a lack of knowledge.
John S Stuart user not visiting Queenzone.com
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Posted: 05 May 08, 07:11 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

Thanks, but I have just had this situation legally cleared.
This sort of con-trick perpetuated on the public is actually illegal and holds no standing in a court of law.

Both PC's and mobile (cell) telephones - and even motor vehicles - are all covered by the same act.
That is it is illegal to halt competition when it comes to upgrading a product.

For example, if my 'phone breaks down, I have the right to keep my old sim-card. If my car punctures
a tyre - then I have a right to change this at any garage. To deny me this right because it has a bit of paper over it - is actually not legally enforceable.

For PC's I can legitimately upgrade RAM memory or my hard-drive - and to prevent me from doing so with a bit of sticky paper - is against not only MY rights - but all fair competition laws also.

Because most people never challenge this and lamely accept manufacturers excuses nothing ever changes. However, because I did challenge and point out that the PC was F****d and that I wanted to preserve the contents of my hard drive - they have accepted they do not have a leg to stand on.

Bottom line is I have a result. PC is off to be repaired or replaced - and full refund for having the drive cloned. So the lesson is never give up what you think is just.





"Listen to them. Children of the night. What music they make."
YourValentine user not visiting Queenzone.com
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Posted: 05 May 08, 07:47 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

Good for you :-)


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Mr Mercury user not visiting Queenzone.com
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Posted: 05 May 08, 09:01 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

Thanks for letting me know about the whole issue. Handy to know. Cheers and well done John.


"Normally i can't dance to save my life.

But as soon as I step in dog shit, I can moonwalk better than Michael Jackson."
Music Man user not visiting Queenzone.com

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Posted: 05 May 08, 18:01 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

That's pretty cool. I wonder if the law is the same over here.


Creativity can always cover for a lack of knowledge.