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Micrówave user not visiting Queenzone.com
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Posted: 13 Jun 08, 11:12 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

Too bad our boys can’t make the list. The Live Aid gig should be included, now that it’s out on DVD…

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The Beatles: At the Hollywood Bowl (1977)

Culled from three mid '60s Hollywood Bowl performances, this live set (which wasn't released until 1977) captured the Fab Four at the height of Beatlemania. With 17,000 screaming fans approximating the roar of a tornado, the Beatles cut through the noise and delivered scorching, amped-up versions of their early radio-pop gems.

James Brown: Live at the Apollo (1963)

This sweat-drenched soul masterpiece is regarded by many as the greatest live album of all time. Recorded in October 1962, at Brown's own expense, the album captured the Godfather of Soul at his most frenzied and passionate. Brown's record company at first balked about issuing a live set, but the album became a blockbuster and remained on the Billboard charts for more than a year.

The Who: Live at Leeds (1970)

How do you follow up a meticulously crafted masterpiece like Tommy? If you're the Who, you crank the amps to 10 and bash out a live set that forgoes finesse in favor of full-throttle thrills. The original material smokes, but as showcased on their scorching version of Eddie Cochran's "Summertime Blues," the original Who was a fantastic cover band as well.

Kiss: Alive! (1975)

Recorded mostly in Detroit, this double-disc set solidified Kiss's burgeoning reputation as one of rock's most exciting live acts. The exuberant "Strutter" and the party anthem "Rock and Roll All Nite" highlight a fever-pitch ambiance that prevails throughout. Not surprisingly, attendance at Kiss shows soared in the weeks immediately following the album's release.

Led Zeppelin: How the West Was Won (2003)

Culled from two shows staged in California in the summer of 1972, this triple-album set captured Led Zeppelin at the height of its powers. An epic version of "Dazed and Confused" and a 23-minute covers medley (bracketed by "Whole Lotta Love") showcase the group's improvisational skills. The band's chemistry was never more in evidence.

Johnny Cash: At Folsom Prison (1968)

Due to the British rock invasion, Johnny Cash's career had been in the doldrums for years before he released the country milestone in 1968. Backed by a sensational touring band that included Carl Perkins, Cash rips his way through such fitting songs as "25 Minutes to Go," "I Got Stripes," and "Busted." Flanked by 2000 riveted inmates, Cash established an empathy between performer and audience that's never been matched.

Bob Dylan: Live 1966 - The "Royal Albert Hall" Concert (1998)

One of the most widely bootlegged albums in history prior to its official release, this historic document saw Dylan defy his "folkie" followers in order to pursue a fiercely personal vision. All went well during the first half of the show, as Dylan delivered solo-acoustic versions of such gems as "Visions of Johanna" and "Mr. Tambourine Man." But when he broke out his electric guitar, all hell broke loose and the catcalls reigned. Confident and resolute, Dylan forged on with one of his greatest performances on record.

Cheap Trick: At Budokan (1978)

Japanese schoolgirls screamed their hearts out--a la Beatlemania--throughout this breakthrough album by America's most under-appreciated power pop maestros. A supremely melodic guitarist, Rick Nielson provides the fuel for charismatic frontman Robin Zander's anthemic vocal flights. Here lie the definitive versions of "Surrender" and "I Want You to Want Me," alongside an ecstatic reading of "Ain't That a Shame."

Rolling Stones: Get Yer Ya Ya's Out (1969)

Small wonder that when the Stones assembled their Hot Rocks collection in 1971, they spurned the studio recording of "Midnight Rambler" in favor of the more exciting version on this live effort. Released in the midst of a spectacular run that included Beggar's Banquet, Let It Bleed, and Sticky Fingers, Ya Ya's captured the World's Greate

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Posted: 13 Jun 08, 11:19 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

Where's Live and Dangerous by Thin Lizzy?? These polls are all a load of bollocks anyway.


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Posted: 13 Jun 08, 11:43 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

Brian_Mays_Wig wrote:

Where's Live and Dangerous by Thin Lizzy?? These polls are all a load of bollocks anyway.


Actually, I don't think Live And Dangerous should even be considered.

Live and dangerous was originally meant to be a studio album with Tony Visconti. But since Visconti had a very tight schedule Phil Lynott came up with the idea that they spend two weeks together compiling a live album instead.

After they had decided which track they were going to use Lynott asked if they could re-record some vocals due to technical issues. After spending some time overdubbing various bits noticing the impact on the result they enden up re-recording all the vocals, guitars and bass. So the only real live elements of Live and Dangerous is the drums and the audience. Visconti justified this by stating that every track was performed before a live audience. The exception being Southbound which was taken from a sound check onstage in Philadelphia

Other sources state that although the finished album contains overdubbing, it is claimed that it is "75% live".


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Posted: 13 Jun 08, 13:21 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

forget about these "Americanized" lists...a good general "live rock albums" list would probably contain mainly 70s albums..as that was when live albums were most popular

how about these...

ufo - strangers in the night
thin lizzy - live and dangerous
peter frampton - framton comes alive
deep purple - made in japan
kiss - alive II
rush - all the world's a stage



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Posted: 13 Jun 08, 14:41 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

Don't fool yourself--the only thing "live" about KISS' "Alive" was the crowd noise. It's a great album all the same, but let's keep it in perspective here. ;)


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Posted: 13 Jun 08, 16:37 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

I agree about the KISS recordings. There was an awful lot of re-recording and dubbing on both Alive and Alive II. Hardluck Woman was recorded during a soundcheck with the audience dubbed in. Great performances on both but a little manufactured.

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Posted: 13 Jun 08, 16:49 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

Micrówave wrote:

Brian_Mays_Wig wrote:

Where's Live and Dangerous by Thin Lizzy?? These polls are all a load of bollocks anyway.


Actually, I don't think Live And Dangerous should even be considered.

Live and dangerous was originally meant to be a studio album with Tony Visconti. But since Visconti had a very tight schedule Phil Lynott came up with the idea that they spend two weeks together compiling a live album instead.

After they had decided which track they were going to use Lynott asked if they could re-record some vocals due to technical issues. After spending some time overdubbing various bits noticing the impact on the result they enden up re-recording all the vocals, guitars and bass. So the only real live elements of Live and Dangerous is the drums and the audience. Visconti justified this by stating that every track was performed before a live audience. The exception being Southbound which was taken from a sound check onstage in Philadelphia

Other sources state that although the finished album contains overdubbing, it is claimed that it is "75% live".


I love Thin lizzy but I've never really read much about them so what follows is guesswork. I know L&D is supposed to be extensively overdubbed but I have a live show from philadelphia 26/10/77 and it has identical versions of Cowboy Song and one or two others from L&D. What does this say? Either the bootleg is fake (it doesn't seem like it to me) or the bootleg is itself "touched up" or L&D is not overdubbed as much as everyone says. In any event, L&D is fantastic, as is the Philadelphia show. You can downlaod it here: http://www.guitars101.com/forums/f90/thin-lizzy-philadelphia-1977-soundboard-320-a-62242.html

Judas Priest's 'Unleashed in the East' should be on that list (even though, if the rumours are to be believed, it should be called 'unleashed in the Studio') as should Rush's 'Exit Stage left'.


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Posted: 13 Jun 08, 19:48 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

Jazz 78 wrote:

I agree about the KISS recordings. There was an awful lot of re-recording and dubbing on both Alive and Alive II. Hardluck Woman was recorded during a soundcheck with the audience dubbed in. Great performances on both but a little manufactured.


So was "Tomorrow And Tonight". XD

That being said... "Alive!" is the main reason I play guitar... <3


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Posted: 14 Jun 08, 05:16 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

Beatles at the Hollywood Bowl?! They don't cut through the crowd, the album is terrible, just horrible noise.