Forums > Queen - General Discussion > Innuendo - Track list on LP and CD

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ITSM user not visiting Queenzone.com

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Posted: 15 Sep 09, 18:50 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote



  Hi !

I'm just curious why the track list is different on the LP and CD ( + cassette) ?

Probably been discussed here before I'm sure, but I can't find it...

If my memory is right, I think the CD and the Cassette got the same order...?

And why are Don't Try So Hard and Bijou a bit different (on the LP) ?
DTSH is almost the same, but Bijou does not got the outro solo...

Thank you for helping me out !

By the way, I kinda like it that it's a bit different, because it's sort of a "new" feeling listening to the LP : )



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Posted: 15 Sep 09, 19:04 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote



Not an answer to your question as such, but the same can be said for Queen (1) - at least as far as listing for cassette to CD is concerned. I never had the LP so I can't speak for that.



I grew up with the cassette, and even though I have had the cd now for longer than I listened to the cassette, I STILL get the next song wrong in my expectation when listening LMAO.




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Posted: 15 Sep 09, 20:01 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

The reason track listings are different on LP  CD and Cassette is because of economy. if you rearrange the tracks on a tape you can save on the amount of tape (or in the case of an LP if you edit a song you can fit it on the vinyl) you use, plain and simple.



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Posted: 16 Sep 09, 01:45 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote



paulsmith2001 wrote:

The reason track listings are different on LP  CD and Cassette is because of economy. if you rearrange the tracks on a tape you can save on the amount of tape (or in the case of an LP if you edit a song you can fit it on the vinyl) you use, plain and simple.

Greatest Hits 1 was 58 minutes long and fitted perfectly on one disc though - the album Innuendo is shorter than that. I don't think it was pressed on 'high grade'-vinyl, so why they decided to cut some tracks....







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Posted: 16 Sep 09, 01:45 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

CD Version:

Innuendo – 6:31
I’m Going Slightly Mad [Mercury] – 4:22 *
Headlong – 4:38 [May] *
I Can’t Live with You [May] – 4:33 *
Don’t Try So Hard [Mercury] – 3:39 *
Ride the Wild Wind [Taylor] – 4:42
All God’s People [Mercury/Moran] – 4:21 *
These Are the Days of Our Lives [Taylor] – 4:15 *
Delilah [Mercury] – 3:35
The Hitman – 4:56 *
Bijou [Mercury/May] – 3:36 *
The Show Must Go On – 4:35 *

All tracks with * are edited on the vinyl, the most notable being: I'm Going Slightly Mad, Don't Try So Hard, The Hitman and Bijou

Vinyl Version:

Side 1:
Innuendo
I'm Going Slightly Mad
Headlong
I Can't Live With You
Ride The Wild Wind
Side 2:
All God's People
These Are The Days Of Our Lives
Delilah
Don't Try So Hard
The Hitman
Bijou
The Show Must Go On





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Posted: 16 Sep 09, 08:41 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

It might have been wiser to leave one entire track off the vinyl, rather than edit more than half the individual songs. I have Innuendo on vinyl, cassette (the first version I owned) and CD. The tracks I've noted as edited are:

I'm Going Slightly Mad (the same edit edit appears on Greatest Hits II)
All God's People (fades out about 30 seconds early)
These Are The Days Of Our Lives (starts with Freddies vocal, no percussion intro)
The Hitman (edited by 2 minutes or so)
Don't Try So Hard (minor edit, but it is there)
Bijou (cut down to only about 1 minute)

What I find amusing is that Bijou was written, according to Brian, as an experiment with Freddie to see if they could inverse the structure of a song, so rather than:

Verse, Chorus, Verse, Chorus, Guitar Solo, Chorus, Verse, Chorus...

which is a standard structure for a lot of songs, they tried:

Guitar Verse, Guitar Chorus, Guitar Verse, Guitar Chorus, Vocal Solo, Guitar Verse, Guitar Chorus, Guitar Chorus...

It's hard to break the song down into verses and choruses, but there are certainly repeating motifs and "guitar lyrics," and that was Queen experimenting right up to the end. What's amusing to me is that in editing the track on the Innuendo LP, the record company only kept the "solo" ("God forbid we cut out lyrics! Heavens to Betsy!") where in a standard song, the solo would likely get cut down in favour of lyrics.

Either way, this song, one the best guitar pieces on a Queen album, seriously got the shaft!

Here's a quote from Brian, via Queenvault:

Brian May: "Bijou was written by Freddie and I together - it was really inspired (in us both!) by Jeff Beck .... I don't know if you realize already, but the song has an unusual format - we wanted to make it a song "inside out" (with its heart on its sleeve). The main parts of the song are played on guitar instead of being sung, and in the middle, where the guitar solo would normally be, appears the short vocal section. The vocal is a succinct and very precise little verse, a little gem, a "Bijou" - a jewel buried at the heart of the piece: hence the name of the song. Each bit of the melody was alive in our heads and "hummed" before it was played - Freddie coming up with the beginning line which started us off on the trail. Those days were very creative - good times.... !"



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Posted: 16 Sep 09, 11:33 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

Quite simple really.
The optimum amount of music you can fit on a 12" record before you start to reduce the thickness of the walls between each groove and thus risk making the disc more prone to damage and also reduce the sound quality, is 22.5 minutes per side - that's why LPs are generally no longer than that.
Because Innuendo is much longer than 45 minutes long, some of the tracks were edited.

As for the reason Absolute Greatest is on 3 LPs, well that's probably not so much as to maximise the quality as it is to make people pay extra money for a third unnecessary disc!

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Posted: 16 Sep 09, 11:49 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote



brians wig wrote:

Quite simple really.
The optimum amount of music you can fit on a 12" record before you start to reduce the thickness of the walls between each groove and thus risk making the disc more prone to damage and also reduce the sound quality, is 22.5 minutes per side - that's why LPs are generally no longer than that.
Because Innuendo is much longer than 45 minutes long, some of the tracks were edited.

As for the reason Absolute Greatest is on 3 LPs, well that's probably not so much as to maximise the quality as it is to make people pay extra money for a third unnecessary disc!

Yep, I think that's it. However, another possible reason could be that, in the UK at least, CDs hadn't quite captured the market yet. They were much more expensive than LPs, and it often needed an incentive of some sort to get people to buy them -- in this case, longer undedited songs. I bought the LP, and didn't listen to the CD until quite a few years later.








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Posted: 18 Sep 09, 11:49 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

As to amount of time on an LP, regarding grooves and quality etc.... that diminishes the quality of the vinyl after going over 45 minutes makes sense......but one album that always sticks out for me is Genesis' "And Then There Were Three", released in 1978.  Total time is over 53 minutes (just like 'Innuendo').  Rather than being able to include the whole album on one side of a 90 or 100 minute cassette, I had to record each side onto a 60 minute tape.

Album quality and sound were fine, no skips developed, so I'll give a great answer as to why various 'Innuendo' tracks were edited down:   I dunno.


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Posted: 29 Sep 09, 19:08 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote


Thank you all for some great answers!

By the way,,, Queen on Ice, what is the song order on the Queen (1) cassette?



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Posted: 30 Sep 09, 13:09 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote



Holly2003 wrote:
Yep, I think that's it. However, another possible reason could be that, in the UK at least, CDs hadn't quite captured the market yet. They were much more expensive than LPs, and it often needed an incentive of some sort to get people to buy them -- in this case, longer undedited songs. I bought the LP, and didn't listen to the CD until quite a few years later.


I had a Mexican Innuendo CD many years ago, listened to it and sold it to a friend years later because I had lost the booklet. Around 2001 I bought it again but now it was a Dutch CD.

It was a BIG SURPRISE to me to listen to Bijou in full as I had only known it in its edited 1-minute version. Almost 10 years being a Queen fan and I had NEVER listened to that piece of music, since the Mexican CD had the edited versions from the vinyl.

Same feeling when I listened to my cousin's MIH CD, which had the original version of Let Me Live. She then gave it to me and now it's one of my most prized items in my collection.