Forums > Queen - General Discussion > Deacon mistakes on Jealousy

forum rss feed
Author

liam user not visiting Queenzone.com

Bohemian: 594 posts
add to buddy list send PM

Posted: 28 Dec 11, 06:59 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

I've read a few times that Deacon made several mistakes on jealousy but to keep the 'live' sound they left them in. Can anybody pinpoint where these are, I'm assuming its notes he's played that aren't in the chord because I can't here any technical faults.


Go, Go, Go, little queenie!!
Jazz 78 user not visiting Queenzone.com

Bohemian: 501 posts
add to buddy list send PM

Posted: 28 Dec 11, 08:14 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

I've also read where John has made a mistake or two on Sleeping on the Sidewalk but like you I can't find where these are. Considering this was a single live take and done after a few drinks we can forgive that slight faux pas. But Jealousy? Interesting.

liam user not visiting Queenzone.com

Bohemian: 594 posts
add to buddy list send PM

Posted: 28 Dec 11, 08:22 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

I think on sleeping with the side walk he plays a few notes that aren't from the chord. It's a brilliant performance though!


Go, Go, Go, little queenie!!
Sebastian user not visiting Queenzone.com
Sebastian
Deity: 6243 posts
add to buddy list send PM

Posted: 28 Dec 11, 11:26 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

I don't remember where on Jealousy his mistakes were, but they weren't too big. Back then, piano, bass and drums were recorded live and there were no repairings, while overdubs (guitars, vocals, percussion) could be re-done until they were virtually perfect.


John hated HS. Fred's fave singer was not PR. Roger didn't compose 'Innuendo.' Witness testimonies are often inaccurate. Scotland's not in England. 'Bo Rhap' hasn't got 180 voices.
Vocal harmony user not visiting Queenzone.com

Royalty: 1197 posts
add to buddy list send PM

Posted: 28 Dec 11, 22:29 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

Over dubbing instruments on the backing track would not be a problem.
Although Brums, Bas, Piano and Rythm guitar were recorded live in the studio they were still recording to multi track tape. The source of each input would always be well shielded from any other instrument, while this did not clear up ambient sound, it meant that each input on the desk had the majority of the signal from the instrument it was recording and not much else. Once recorded it would be very easy to go back and dropin any note, phrase, or beats that the band were not happy with.
Much has been made of the fact that Queen recorded their backing tracks live, but it should also be noted that very often they would play and record "live" but than take the most perfect 16 bars of a recording and make a drum loop on which to build on. Using this method mistakes can be re,recorded multiple times very easily until perfection is achieved.

Sebastian user not visiting Queenzone.com
Sebastian
Deity: 6243 posts
add to buddy list send PM

Posted: 29 Dec 11, 05:52 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

Care to give specific examples?

Yes - punching in could be done. But no, they didn't do it. They opted for preserving the moment (during the Roy/Mike era, that is).

At the end of the day, a backing track that is 99% perfect but has the right chemistry is better than a backing track that is 100% perfect but has lost all feeling.


John hated HS. Fred's fave singer was not PR. Roger didn't compose 'Innuendo.' Witness testimonies are often inaccurate. Scotland's not in England. 'Bo Rhap' hasn't got 180 voices.
thomasquinn 32989 user not visiting Queenzone.com
thomasquinn 32989
Deity: 6246 posts
add to buddy list send PM

Posted: 29 Dec 11, 08:19 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

To quote Brian May and Frank Zappa:

"I was fortunate enough to meet Frank Zappa, a truly great rock musician, and a very unorthodox and innovative creator. He was already very ill when I met him (I was working with his son in L.A.) I told him I admired his skill and courage in improvising so much in his music, live in front of large audiences. He said, 'Courage? - What do you mean?!' I said that I was always very aware of the possibilities of making mistakes. He replied, 'How can you make a mistake? It is your solo, your guitar, and you are playing a piece of your own music. Who could possibly tell you you are making a mistake?!!'"


Not Plutus but Apollo rules Parnassus

Micrówave user not visiting Queenzone.com
Delilah, on Medium Power
Micrówave
Deity: 7037 posts
add to buddy list send PM

Posted: 29 Dec 11, 10:09 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote


That's a pretty good point...

Who is calling them "mistakes"?

Sheer Brass Neck user not visiting Queenzone.com

Bohemian: 715 posts
add to buddy list send PM

Posted: 29 Dec 11, 10:22 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

It is a good point, but if a note doesn't fit in structurally then it would stand out. Maybe not a mistake, maybe not what the musician intended to play either.

inu-liger user not visiting Queenzone.com
inu-liger
Deity: 13057 posts
add to buddy list send PM

Posted: 30 Dec 11, 06:20 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

You want an obvious Deaky studio mistake? Listen to when he starts on "I Go Crazy"

thomasquinn 32989 user not visiting Queenzone.com
thomasquinn 32989
Deity: 6246 posts
add to buddy list send PM

Posted: 03 Jan 12, 09:41 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

What does "fitting structurally" mean? I'm sure there are mistakes on many recorded songs, what I'm saying is that it's not always easy to pick out what is (and is not) a mistake.

For instance, if you had intended to play an F# bass note with a G major chord (for instance, as part of a descending scale), but instead, you play a G by mistake, you would not necessarily recognize it as a mistake by listening. Similarly, a jarring dissonant bass note might've been fully intentional, even if it's not appreciated by most listeners.

I'm willing to accept that the instances cited above are mistakes, but I would argue that we cannot be sure.


Not Plutus but Apollo rules Parnassus

Marshallhead user not visiting Queenzone.com

Be Gentle, I'm a newbie: 9 posts
add to buddy list send PM

Posted: 03 Jan 12, 12:34 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

There may be some unintended notes, but they're in key, yo may not know. Playing in a straightforward key normallnhas a small range of "howlers" as I call them, the more musically schooled may refer to them as avoid notes. Examples are playing a C# over a Cmin or an F over an E major when playing in those particular keys.

FWIW there's a mistake by Brian on Fat Bottomed Girls when he "forgets" he's in dropped D tuning, and plays an F under his open G chord on the breakdown just before the "mortgages and homes" part.

Marshallhead user not visiting Queenzone.com

Be Gentle, I'm a newbie: 9 posts
add to buddy list send PM

Posted: 03 Jan 12, 12:36 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

Apologies for my clumsy iPad typing not helped by no edit facilities.

Sheer Brass Neck user not visiting Queenzone.com

Bohemian: 715 posts
add to buddy list send PM

Posted: 03 Jan 12, 16:22 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

"What does "fitting structurally" mean? "  Better answer than I could give two posts up.