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Bohardy user not visiting Queenzone.com

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Posted: 01 Feb 04, 08:35 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

This is a plea for help from the more technically minded of you.

I've recently got a new widescreen TV - a Panasonic TX-PS28 - and for watching DVDs, all is hunky-dory.

However, I've just recently noticed that when I watch TV through my cable box (I've got Telewest Broadband), which is all the time because the reception is miles better for the normal channels than through the aerial, the picture is 'zoomed-in' slightly, chopping bits of the edges of the picture. This happens on all broadcasts, and is significantly worse on programmes broadcast in Widescreen. Changing the aspect on the TV does nothing.

I'm not too technical myself, but I understand that regardless of what aspect I've got the TV on, if a show is broadcast in Widescreen, the TV picks up a signal and automatically adjusts to Widescreen mode. I know this to be the case, because I've had it happen when watching through the terrestrial channels, not going through cable.

It seems that the cable box somehow does not detect these signals, and as I said, even programmes that are shown in 4:3 are hacked off at the sides (and possibly at the top as well, because it looks to be zoomed-in).

This is pissing me off no end.

Has anybody got any idea how to resolve this, or has similar problems themselves?


Gullibility and credulity are considered undesirable qualities in every department of human life -- except religion.
Bohardy user not visiting Queenzone.com

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Posted: 02 Feb 04, 09:47 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

Well I did check for that Barry (and I.L.K) but it appears I didn't check hard enough.

Cheers for the help guys, I'll try this later on.


Gullibility and credulity are considered undesirable qualities in every department of human life -- except religion.