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Kevin Spacey user not visiting Queenzone.com

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Posted: 10 Feb 05, 16:40 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

Hi, I'm from Poland and I'm a teacher of English. This question is addressed to all the native speakers of English on this forum. What is the difference between such words:

cling vs. clutch
giggle vs. chuckle

I know the previous two mean roughly 'to hold sth tightly' and the other two mean 'to laugh quitely' but what is the difference? I tried all the dictionaries of English I have access to but I was not able to find this info.

Thanks in advance

PS. I know it is not at all connected with Queen but, dear Queenzoners, you're my only hope ;)


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agneepath! 11994 user not visiting Queenzone.com

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Posted: 10 Feb 05, 16:50 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

giggle vs. chuckle:

good question!

giggle is what young children do / cheeky laugh
chuckle: for adults - its a more reflective laugh.


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Posted: 10 Feb 05, 17:48 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

cluch is a firm grip and cling is a desperate grip, like it could come loose if your not careful.


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jasen101 user not visiting Queenzone.com

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Posted: 11 Feb 05, 02:45 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

buy a damn dictionary and look it up!


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Posted: 11 Feb 05, 02:49 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

He/she did.


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Posted: 11 Feb 05, 03:28 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

"cluch is a firm grip and cling is a desperate grip, like it could come loose if your not careful."

I don't agree

clutch/cling both mean hold tight in a firm grip

but in addition
"cling" means
- to adhere to something (wet paper clings to glass)
- to stick together for a longer period of time
- to remain attached as to an idea, memory etc

"clutch" means
- to seize or snatch
- or to try to seize or grasp

I recommend the Webster's Dictionary for American usage and Oxford Dictionary for British usage.




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Kevin Spacey user not visiting Queenzone.com

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Posted: 11 Feb 05, 08:12 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

As for the dictionaries, I have Webster, Oxford and Cambridge. All are very good ones but the problem with the words above is that both words in each pair have the same equivalent in Polish and this blurs the image. So it is often extremely useful to consult a native speaker - especially that the words cause controversy even among native speakers themselves as we have seen :) And you're the only native speakers I know :)

Anyway, thanks for your help. You've cleared my picture


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Lady Cool Cat user not visiting Queenzone.com

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Posted: 12 Feb 05, 07:28 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

Giggle and Chuckle might be Synonyms, or things that mean the samne thing.


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My Melancholy Blues user not visiting Queenzone.com
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Posted: 12 Feb 05, 15:29 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

Oh, that's just my question! I happened to see these words many times when I was reading English books for teens. Also I've seen 'giggle' and 'chuckle' in the biography of Queen before...THX!


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Posted: 12 Feb 05, 16:52 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

Women and children giggle

Men chuckle

Kevin Spacey user not visiting Queenzone.com

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Posted: 27 Feb 05, 14:23 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

hi again,
you were very helpful last time :)
therefore I decided to ask you for help once again. the question is: is there or isn't there any difference in meaning between these words:

'ring road' and 'bypass'
'dual carriageway' and 'motorway'

again I've looked them up in my dictionaries and they do not mention any difference. nevertheless, I've found some vocabulary exercises which treat them as separate semantic units, so I would be grateful for any feedback.

thanks


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brENsKi user not visiting Queenzone.com
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Posted: 27 Feb 05, 16:45 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

ring road - is what it says
a road that forms a circular route around a con-urbation, with exit routes all the way around - to allow access to local districts more directly without having to cut through the town - the M25 is perhaps the best and worst example

by-pass is just a road that passes by a location - usualy to speed up through-traffic
- the m6 toll road is a great example of one of these

dual carriageway and motorway are a little more difficult

both are two/three lane (in each direction) roads - the only main difference being the rules that apply - no learner drivers on motorway, no roundabouts to exit - exits are marked by junctions

dual carriageways also have parking stops periodically along the road, motorways do not allow stopping - you have to leave the mootorway to rest/stop





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Brimon user not visiting Queenzone.com

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Posted: 27 Feb 05, 16:52 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

Dual carriageway has two lanes of traffic going in one direction and a motorway has three.

You beat me to it Brenski.


brENsKi user not visiting Queenzone.com
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Posted: 27 Feb 05, 17:01 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

Brimon wrote:

Dual carriageway has two lanes of traffic going in one direction and a motorway has three.

You beat me to it Brenski.


i take it you do drive Brimon?
because many motorways in this country have only TWO lanes

and the "dual" in dual-carriageway doesn't refer to the "number of lanes" it refers to the number of actual carriageways - as they are split in half by a central reservation - just like a motorway - but generally full of nice green stuff instead of the gravel, broken exhausts and shressed tyre-casings you find on a motorway central reservation


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Kevin Spacey user not visiting Queenzone.com

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Posted: 27 Feb 05, 17:22 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

many thanks Brenski :) you've helped me a lot


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