Forums > Queen - Serious Discussion > Britishisms in Queen lyrics

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Sebastian user not visiting Queenzone.com
Sebastian
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Posted: 17 Sep 05, 10:07 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

I remember some nice lists about British slang used in Beatles' music (http://www.recmusicbeatles.com/public/files/faqs/britguide.html), and I wonder if we could compile such a list with Queen tracks. Any contribution is welcomed


John hated HS. Fred's fave singer was not PR. Roger didn't compose 'Innuendo.' Witness testimonies are often inaccurate. Scotland's not in England. 'Bo Rhap' hasn't got 180 voices.
egret user not visiting Queenzone.com

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Posted: 17 Sep 05, 11:27 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

I can contribute a question.

In "Friends Will Be Friends," there is something about "taking all the cash and leaving you with the lumber."

Does "leaving you with the lumber" actually mean anything, colloquially, in that line? I wasn't sure if it was an unknown Britishism or just random lazy lyricizing.

I've never asked any actual British people for fear of sounding like a big nerd, but I never worry about that here on Queenzone :)

--Egret

pcgenius9 user not visiting Queenzone.com

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Posted: 17 Sep 05, 12:52 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

No "leaving you with the lumber" actually means something along the lines of "all the problems that come with it".

So in Friends Will Be Friends, "taking all the cash leaving you with the lumber" literally refers to the problems that are faced when you have no money.


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stateside fan user not visiting Queenzone.com

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Posted: 17 Sep 05, 19:15 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

i assume it means the house,perhaps mortgaged thru the nostrils lol.


john pistlli
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Posted: 17 Sep 05, 20:41 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

Yes but shouldn't it be "Mates Will Be Mates" then?

;)

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Posted: 18 Sep 05, 01:55 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

pcgenius9 wrote:

No "leaving you with the lumber" actually means something along the lines of "all the problems that come with it".

So in Friends Will Be Friends, "taking all the cash leaving you with the lumber" literally refers to the problems that are faced when you have no money.


Thanks for the explanation. I'm glad it means something. I feel all enlightened and cosmopolitan now :)

--Egret

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Posted: 18 Sep 05, 04:55 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

online dictionary says

Something useless or cumbersome
and calls it a chiefly british expression. there you go

if you want a song full of britishisms
you need look no further than
killer queen


go deo na h√Čireann
Sebastian user not visiting Queenzone.com
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Posted: 18 Sep 05, 10:08 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

Yes I thought about Killer Queen when I wrote the post


John hated HS. Fred's fave singer was not PR. Roger didn't compose 'Innuendo.' Witness testimonies are often inaccurate. Scotland's not in England. 'Bo Rhap' hasn't got 180 voices.
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Posted: 19 Sep 05, 10:12 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

hammer to fall - "it' doesn't rain but it pours" - is that british too?


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Posted: 19 Sep 05, 13:12 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

I don't know of that line in Hammer To Fall. I even checked in the lyrics booklet with the CD


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Posted: 19 Sep 05, 14:35 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

spymyshadow wrote:

hammer to fall - "it' doesn't rain but it pours" - is that british too?


"Lock your door the rain is pouring..."

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Posted: 19 Sep 05, 15:36 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

Thats it. No that isn't just British


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Posted: 19 Sep 05, 18:59 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

spymyshadow wrote:

hammer to fall - "it' doesn't rain but it pours" - is that british too?


Under Pressure -

'It never rains but it pours'

But I heard that expression in American movies.


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Posted: 19 Sep 05, 20:28 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

How about "Driving back in style in my "saloon"will do quite nicely",from Good Old Fashioned Loverboy.That is 100 percent british.

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Posted: 23 Sep 05, 00:27 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

Ravenetta wrote:

what about "soups in the laundry bag?" call me naive but i havent heard that phrase outside the song...



but i love all the euphamismns to craziness in IGSM


I think it means poverty, the old imagery of a bum carrying a stick over his shoulder with a laundry bag tied to the end of it with soup or whatever else inside the bag. Hence the next line the song "now you got strings gonna lose your rag"