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Joeker user not visiting Queenzone.com
Joeker
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Posted: 19 Mar 06, 18:30 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

why did Queen record songs for the BBC anyways? Or any other groups for that matter?


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Brian: No, You Can't...

---------------------------------------

Freddie: Oh Shit, All this crap again?!



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Sherwood Forest user not visiting Queenzone.com

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Posted: 19 Mar 06, 18:31 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

probably to get publicity


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Posted: 19 Mar 06, 18:33 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

I agree with Jamie...just my opinion however

Cheers


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Posted: 19 Mar 06, 18:44 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

There were bizarre rules (I think that the Musician's Union got passed) that required some sort of performance quota of radio in the UK (as opposed to playing records). As a result, many artists used to record a handful of tracks specially for the BBC to broadcast - giving guaranteed exposure in return for probably a day's work.

Artists you may have heard of who have released "BBC Session" albums...

The Beatles
Led Zeppelin
Queen
T Rex
David Bowie

The practice still continues, although I expect the original rules have been changed, and the concept of "doing a BBC Session" now establishes an artist as having musical ability, and a certain credibility (as the radio shows that feature them tend to be the cooler ones, or at least would want to considered cooler).



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Posted: 19 Mar 06, 19:02 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

Thanks wrote:

There were bizarre rules (I think that the Musician's Union got passed) that required some sort of performance quota of radio in the UK (as opposed to playing records). As a result, many artists used to record a handful of tracks specially for the BBC to broadcast - giving guaranteed exposure in return for probably a day's work.

Artists you may have heard of who have released "BBC Session" albums...

The Beatles
Led Zeppelin
Queen
T Rex
David Bowie

The practice still continues, although I expect the original rules have been changed, and the concept of "doing a BBC Session" now establishes an artist as having musical ability, and a certain credibility (as the radio shows that feature them tend to be the cooler ones, or at least would want to considered cooler).


i think the who also did BBC sessions a lot of bands did thank god not acca dacca


and ur rushing headlong out of control

and u think ur so strong but there ain't no stoppin u

and there is nothing u can do about it
its_a_hard_life 26994 user not visiting Queenzone.com

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Posted: 19 Mar 06, 19:25 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

Nearly every band has done that it's not something to be surprised about you know. I have that album, it's really good.

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Posted: 20 Mar 06, 11:18 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote


Dire Straits have done it also (it's on an official album).

Perhaps The Who, also, but I don't know for sure.


Being a Scolar when it comes to Queen...
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Posted: 20 Mar 06, 11:22 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

Its a great way of putting yourself out there and across to people.


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Posted: 20 Mar 06, 14:25 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

Just to confirm, as its one of my collection, The mighty Who did record several sessions for the Beeb.

Below is the Amazon review, in case anyone wants to dabble. By the way, if anyone wants to hear an early "rock opera", have a listen to "A Quick One While He's Away". An excellent track.

For a rockin' version of this, check out the Rolling Stones' Rock n Roll Circus. One of the reasons the Circus remained unreleased for so long was this very song. When you see it performed, you'll understand why the Stones were left feeling so down-at-heel...

Laydeeeez and jellybeans, I give you....The 'Oo!







Amazon.co.uk Review
This 26-track collection traces The Who's transition from R&B covers ("Dancing In The Street", "Good Lovin'") to assured art-rock, and includes previously unreleased versions of "My Generation", "Substitute", "I'm A Boy" and "Happy Jack". The later tracks ("The Seeker", "I'm Free" and "Shakin' All Over") capture The Who between the ambitious Tommy and the energetic Live At Leeds, while period atmosphere is provided by resilient DJ Brian Matthew, who gets Pete Townshend to admit that by January 1967 The Who had destroyed about 6,000 of equipment. In between is a striking version of The Who's first opera, "A Quick One" and a couple of jingles recorded for Radio 1 at a time when it was the only national outlet for pop music. Altogether a fascinating account of the band's development, although it was a close-run thing--in 1965 the BBC had turned The Who down for being "ponderous and unentertaining". --Patrick Humphries


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