Forums > Personal > Can Anyone Tell Me about These Colleges/Universities

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DreaminQueen user not visiting Queenzone.com

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Posted: 13 Jun 06, 18:10 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

Hello all. I'm beginning my college search as this time next year i'll be heading off to the real world... THANK GOD... anywho... these are some of the schools that I'm interested in based on what they offer. And i havent made any campus visits yet... im going to this summer... any advice would be great. THANKS SO MUCH! And any other suggested schools in the NYS/PENN/MASS vicinity... I'm interested in Liberal Arts, Music, Art, Travel, Biology, History, French... and other things...

IONA COLLEGE -- in New Rochelle NY

ONEONTA COLLEGE -- in Oneonta NY

MANHATTANVILLE -- in Purchase NY (j/outside NYC)

HARTWICK COLLEGE -- in ONEONTA NY

CANISIUS COLLEGE -- in Buffalo NY

DREXEL UNIVERSITY-- in Philadelphia PA

UNIVERSITY OF ROCHESTER -- in Rochester NY

PLYMOUTH STATE UNIVERSITY-- in Plymouth NH

UNIVERSITY AT ALBANY -- in Albany NY

NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSTIY -- in Boston MA

MARYMOUNT COLLEGE -- in Tarrytown NY

NIAGARA UNIVERSTIY -- in Niagra NY

FORDHAM UNIVERSITY-- in Bronx NY

and finally...

WELLS COLLEGE -- in AURORA NY



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Posted: 14 Jun 06, 16:03 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

Thomas Quinn wrote:


American universities have a really bad name world-wide. There is a policy of giving students high marks for bad work they hand in.


You really are talking crap!

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Posted: 14 Jun 06, 16:08 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

PieterMC wrote:

Thomas Quinn wrote:


American universities have a really bad name world-wide. There is a policy of giving students high marks for bad work they hand in.


You really are talking crap!


I know A's weren't handed to me on a silver platter.

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Posted: 14 Jun 06, 16:08 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

<b><font color = "crimson">Thomas Quinn wrote:




American universities have a really bad name world-wide. There is a policy of giving students high marks for bad work they hand in. This is well-known throughout the professional world, so they'll take a diploma from one of those universities with a grain of salt. These practices mainly take place in the Ivy League colleges, but be sure to check the status of the university of your choice.


Thank you very much Thomas. I dont intend on attending an Ivy League college... My grades are not perfect enough and defintaly wayyy to expensive. And i live in the US so i dont have to many other options at this point as far as thats concerned off the bat anyways. But i will definatly take that advice. Thanks again for your sage words.
Cheers!

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Posted: 14 Jun 06, 16:09 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

What people think goes on in America and what really goes on are two totally different things.

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Posted: 14 Jun 06, 16:20 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

Please ignore Caspar; no clue why he considers himself a good judge of American universities. There are those in America who readily argue that European schools are poor in comparison to US schools, so that argument is a catch-22.

It should be noted that American schools do attract many international students, espcecially in the maths and sciences, so his claim that "American universities have a really bad name world-wide" doesn't really wash. (And yes, Caspar, we are well aware that your father taught at a SUNY school. But how a 17 year old Dutch boy can claim to be so acquainted with the workings of the "professional world" is beyond me.)

As for the original request:

Take the areas you are intested in (such as History) and see what classes they offer in that area. Look over the faculty and see who teaches those classes, and try to figure out how big the average class size is. (There are websites that rank schools based on academic departments, look for those)

Then, ask yourself what you want to do with the degree. Most schools will provide simple statistics as to what their graduates end up doing with their degress, so look for that.

Finally, go visit the schools.





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Posted: 14 Jun 06, 16:22 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

DreaminQueen wrote:

<b><font color = "crimson">Thomas Quinn wrote:




American universities have a really bad name world-wide. There is a policy of giving students high marks for bad work they hand in. This is well-known throughout the professional world, so they'll take a diploma from one of those universities with a grain of salt. These practices mainly take place in the Ivy League colleges, but be sure to check the status of the university of your choice.


Thank you very much Thomas. I dont intend on attending an Ivy League college... My grades are not perfect enough and defintaly wayyy to expensive. And i live in the US so i dont have to many other options at this point as far as thats concerned off the bat anyways. But i will definatly take that advice. Thanks again for your sage words.
Cheers!


Those were anything but "sage words." As others have already said, his advice was "crap."


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Posted: 14 Jun 06, 16:23 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

PieterMC wrote:

What people think goes on in America and what really goes on are two totally different things.


Yea, as an American, I can attest to that.
We seem to attract a rather negative stigma around here.

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Posted: 14 Jun 06, 16:27 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

Zeni wrote:

DreaminQueen wrote:

<b><font color = "crimson">Thomas Quinn wrote:




American universities have a really bad name world-wide. There is a policy of giving students high marks for bad work they hand in. This is well-known throughout the professional world, so they'll take a diploma from one of those universities with a grain of salt. These practices mainly take place in the Ivy League colleges, but be sure to check the status of the university of your choice.


Thank you very much Thomas. I dont intend on attending an Ivy League college... My grades are not perfect enough and defintaly wayyy to expensive. And i live in the US so i dont have to many other options at this point as far as thats concerned off the bat anyways. But i will definatly take that advice. Thanks again for your sage words.
Cheers!


Those were anything but "sage words." As others have already said, his advice was "crap."


I suppose that was rather naive for me to say... But i know some shady stuff does occur at some schools. But i know they dont fling around A's like nothing...

Thanks for your advice too by the way. :D


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Posted: 14 Jun 06, 16:35 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

As someone associated with a major American university, I can attest to some of the shady things that occur at school. Grade inflation is a problem in some schools, but my experience is that it is a professor-by-professor problem. Some professors just don't care what their students get; others do. Smaller schools are more geared to teaching, while larger universities tend to be more concerned about research. You might keep that in mind and see what benefit (teaching/research) it can be to you.

If you want to go to college to party, then your grades will probably be low. If you work hard at your studies, your grades will reflect that. It's not rocket science to figure that out (unless you actually go into rocket science).


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Posted: 14 Jun 06, 16:57 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

I see you're thinking of going to a school on the NY Tri State Area.

Whatever you do, don't pick Adelphi University. It's an expensive private school with shit education where all the preppie rich kids go to spend more time partying than studying.


[QUOTE][QUOTENAME]Brandon wrote: [/QUOTENAME]... and now the "best you can offer is Mr. Jingles? HA! He's... just pathetic.[/QUOTE]
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Posted: 14 Jun 06, 17:17 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

I can't say much about the universities you listed, but I can offer some advice:
A few posts up, it was brought up that smaller schools are more teaching based, while larger ones are more research based. I'm at a university right now (Central Michigan University) that is in the transition of going from a teaching based to a research based. Depending on what you want to study, both have their benefits. If you need the extra time from professors, better go with a teaching based school. Research based schools tend to be better geared toward the independent student who doesn't need to have their hand held and their backs prodded to get stuff done. Plus, research heavy schools tend to look better on resumes, depending on what you are studying.
Grade inflation is going to be a problem no matter where you go....a school in the US or a school in Europe. It usually depends on the proffessor, so you can't judge an entire school or sets of schools by that standard alone. Don't worry too much about that though.
Here's some more general advice:
1) realize that those little forms they'll give you to fill out roommate preferences don't even get looked at when they go about assigning dorms, but most schools are pretty good about moving you if you are in a really bad situation
2) meet as many different types of people as you can. Learning to interact with them here is much better than trying to do it on the professional level.
3) while going out and having fun every once in a while isn't a bad thing, remember if you start to party too much that you are paying good tuition money to get wasted and puke...not a good trade off
4) STUDY ABROAD! Seriously, do this! I wish it was a requirement for all US students. There are tons of monies available if you don't have the money to pay for it yourself, and believe me it's worth every penny. Besides, when else could you travel around the world without being tied down to a family or kids or jobs? Retirement is a long ways off, and by then your body is going to crap anyway...



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Posted: 14 Jun 06, 17:20 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

Funny how Caspar thinks he knows more about the education in American Universities than those who have actually spent 4 or 5 years studying here.




[QUOTE][QUOTENAME]Brandon wrote: [/QUOTENAME]... and now the "best you can offer is Mr. Jingles? HA! He's... just pathetic.[/QUOTE]
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Posted: 14 Jun 06, 17:39 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

<b><font color = "crimson">Thomas Quinn wrote:


American universities have a really bad name world-wide. There is a policy of giving students high marks for bad work they hand in. This is well-known throughout the professional world, so they'll take a diploma from one of those universities with a grain of salt. These practices mainly take place in the Ivy League colleges, but be sure to check the status of the university of your choice.


Actually, higher education in the United States is among the most reputable around the world, with extremely high representations of international students who aspire to attend university overseas.

Schools such as the Massachusettes Institute of Technology and the California Institute of Technology are the most advanced and revered colleges for engineering and the sciences. Ivy League schools such as Yale, Princeton, Harvard, Columbia, UPenn, and Brown have shown consistent excellence in all fields, in both education and reputation. Even non-Ivy League schools such as Stanford, Amherst, Duke, Georgetown, Williams, etc. are considered some of the greatest schools in the world.

Most countries have perhaps one or two schools that can match the excellence of these schools.

Edit: Also, the aesthetics and beauty of the campuses are unparalleled. I would go so far as to say that college campuses are among the most beautiful places to be in the US. For instance, if anyone has the opportunity to visit Swarthmore College, I totally recommend it! Aside from being an elite university on par with any college in the states or elsewhere, it also has the most beautiful campus that I have ever seen.

====

Back on topic, I have only been to the University of Rochester, and it is a very nice campus bordered by the beautiful scenery of a river. Academics there are great in general and they have one of the greatest schools of music in the nation (Eastman, I believe?), on equal par with Julliard, which perhaps you may have heard of. If you can get in, I don't think you will regret going there. I had to decline my acceptance and hefty scholarship because another school offered my a full ride, but I promise that UR was my next choice!


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Posted: 14 Jun 06, 22:05 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

Zeni wrote:

As someone associated with a major American university, I can attest to some of the shady things that occur at school. Grade inflation is a problem in some schools, but my experience is that it is a professor-by-professor problem. Some professors just don't care what their students get; others do. Smaller schools are more geared to teaching, while larger universities tend to be more concerned about research. You might keep that in mind and see what benefit (teaching/research) it can be to you.

If you want to go to college to party, then your grades will probably be low. If you work hard at your studies, your grades will reflect that. It's not rocket science to figure that out (unless you actually go into rocket science).


Yea, i figured that grade inflation deal was, as i've seen a few friends in college, and they dont exactly have great grades flying out of nowhere....

But no, im not a party person. I may go and have fun now and then, but im going to work... And thats how its always been for me, i work hard, and its gotten me into the National Honor Society, so im not going to let up now! thats for damn sure....

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Posted: 14 Jun 06, 22:08 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

Mr.Jingles wrote:

I see you're thinking of going to a school on the NY Tri State Area.

Whatever you do, don't pick Adelphi University. It's an expensive private school with shit education where all the preppie rich kids go to spend more time partying than studying.


Yes i am because itd be easier for me to get home if i needed to and for holidays. But far enough so i'm not running home at the first signs of home sickness...

But thanks for the Tip about Adelphi, that was actually one of the ones i had on my list but forgot about... so i'll take it off now! I deal enough with taht where i go to school as it is... i wanna get away from that!

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Posted: 14 Jun 06, 22:12 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

CMU HistoryGirl wrote:

I can't say much about the universities you listed, but I can offer some advice:
A few posts up, it was brought up that smaller schools are more teaching based, while larger ones are more research based. I'm at a university right now (Central Michigan University) that is in the transition of going from a teaching based to a research based. Depending on what you want to study, both have their benefits. If you need the extra time from professors, better go with a teaching based school. Research based schools tend to be better geared toward the independent student who doesn't need to have their hand held and their backs prodded to get stuff done. Plus, research heavy schools tend to look better on resumes, depending on what you are studying.
Grade inflation is going to be a problem no matter where you go....a school in the US or a school in Europe. It usually depends on the proffessor, so you can't judge an entire school or sets of schools by that standard alone. Don't worry too much about that though.
Here's some more general advice:
1) realize that those little forms they'll give you to fill out roommate preferences don't even get looked at when they go about assigning dorms, but most schools are pretty good about moving you if you are in a really bad situation
2) meet as many different types of people as you can. Learning to interact with them here is much better than trying to do it on the professional level.
3) while going out and having fun every once in a while isn't a bad thing, remember if you start to party too much that you are paying good tuition money to get wasted and puke...not a good trade off
4) STUDY ABROAD! Seriously, do this! I wish it was a requirement for all US students. There are tons of monies available if you don't have the money to pay for it yourself, and believe me it's worth every penny. Besides, when else could you travel around the world without being tied down to a family or kids or jobs? Retirement is a long ways off, and by then your body is going to crap anyway...


That is definatly AWESOME ADVICE! Thanks very much...

AND YES STUDYING ABROAD IS ONE OF MY PREREQUISITES ACTUALLY! I CANT WAIT TO DO IT EITHER!! IM ITCHING TO TRAVEL! in fact a friend of mines sister j/ got back from Egypt where she spent a semester and she came into our history class and told us all about it... my mouth was on the floor in awe, i was like a fish hooked the moment the hook hit the water! I was like o yea, i definatly want to travel! And hopefully join one of those community service club things that travels and helps out around the world. id really love that!

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Posted: 14 Jun 06, 22:15 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

<b><font color=666600>Music Man wrote: Back on topic, I have only been to the University of Rochester, and it is a very nice campus bordered by the beautiful scenery of a river. Academics there are great in general and they have one of the greatest schools of music in the nation (Eastman, I believe?), on equal par with Julliard, which perhaps you may have heard of. If you can get in, I don't think you will regret going there. I had to decline my acceptance and hefty scholarship because another school offered my a full ride, but I promise that UR was my next choice!



Thanks! I'll defintaly pay a visit there. See my problem is at this point is choosing which ones to visit and what not. And i've got some family in the Rochester/Irodequoit area.... And The music thing would be fantastic! i lvoe music! On par with Julliard! Damn sign me up lol!

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Posted: 15 Jun 06, 08:43 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

Of course as always you know everything.


Just because the University that your father worked at had that policy does not automatically make all the Universities in the US the same.

There is a problem with High School education in the US, due to the fact that 1 in 3 will not graduate.

Being someone who moved from the UK to the US I can assure you that living in the US is probably nothing like what many of you think it is like.

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Posted: 15 Jun 06, 11:17 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

PieterMC wrote:

Of course as always you know everything.


Just because the University that your father worked at had that policy does not automatically make all the Universities in the US the same.

There is a problem with High School education in the US, due to the fact that 1 in 3 will not graduate.

Being someone who moved from the UK to the US I can assure you that living in the US is probably nothing like what many of you think it is like.


And what are your thoughts?? as someone whos live in the US her whole life, i dont know of anything else. Do we deserve the negative stigma we get all the time??