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Nathan user not visiting Queenzone.com

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Posted: 16 Dec 06, 14:52 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

Anything by Wilbur Smith.

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Posted: 16 Dec 06, 15:59 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

"What's Eating Gilbert Grape" and "Picture of Dorian Gray" are both amazing..!


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Posted: 16 Dec 06, 16:09 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

I love everything by Roald Dahl and Edgar Allan Poe. :D
I also like The Da Vinci Code and Angels and Demons by Dan Brown. Yes, I read them!
I am also reading a really good book called "The Poe Shadow" about a guy who is trying to investigate Edgar's mysterious death. :D


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Posted: 16 Dec 06, 17:17 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

I just finished 'When the Legends Die' by Hal Borland for school last week; simple reading with deep stuff tied into it, a good read it was.

I still have a long line of books to read, I'm still reading that Lord of the Rings stuff.

I want to get into more J.R.R. Tolkien really, Charlotte Brontë, Jack Kerouac, Gil Scott-Heron (actually any author having to do with the Beat Generation and the Counterculture, Bohemianism, all that), Albert Camus, Jacques Prévert, Stephen Crane, and loads more to list.

Does anyone have any book suggestions for the Beat generation/Counterculture thing I mentioned?


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Posted: 16 Dec 06, 17:23 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

<font color=BrianJM>RollingZepBowieQueen wrote:

How's William Golding's 'Lord of the Flies'? I want to read that as soon as I get a copy.


That's a fantastic book. I need to read it again, as I first read it in middle school, so I probably didn't fully understand the meaning of the novel as much with a, you know, younger brain.


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Posted: 16 Dec 06, 20:10 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

anything by stephen king.especially IT.
to kill a mockingbird.
never read harry potter and have no intention of.
also like biographies,just finished mick foley's and im just about to start I,ROBOT by asimov.hope its better than the film.


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Posted: 16 Dec 06, 20:21 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

1984! I'm not even sure if I finished that or not. :\


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Posted: 16 Dec 06, 20:31 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

Danny1 wrote:

Well, if memory serves the airliner the boys are on crashes due to a atomic blast. So i think one of the statements the author might have been trying to make was that the human race would be reduced almost to the level of animals if a nuclear war happened.


I think the plane was actually shot down. It's argued that they were being protected from WWII, or from your mentioning, evacuated from a nuclear war. But it isn't very clear.


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Posted: 16 Dec 06, 20:47 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

Almost everything Stephen King creates.

My all time favorite is The Green Mile.


Not only it's incredibly hard to put down, but I think there's many underlying universal truths in it. The book covers: risking everything to do what is right, how the death penalty has flaws and can take away an innocent's life, second chances, evil that goes unnoticed, prejudice, trust & innocence, and much more.

And, of course, it has a good chunk of action and a lot of suspense. It has a sad ending, but that's one of the things I like about Stephen King books-he keeps it real. A fiction book that tries to be as realistic as possible should rarely have a happy ending. I don't see why schools don't put the book into their curriculum of reading.


Also, The Journal of Professor Abraham Van Helsing.

It's a non-fiction. I've read Stoker's Dracula, and I find this "journal" to be fascinating. Some man found a journal in his great grandfather's attic. Many people thought this man was a bit crazy, and that's clearly the case with the notes. But the notes appeared to be orginally "Van Helsing's" and the great grandfather took notes on them, leaving his own messages. It appeared that he was "friends" with Van Helsing. Of course the crazy great- grandfather probably made up a whole bunch of bull, but the whole reason why it's non-fiction is because it's actually the journal the guy found, published. There's footnotes at the bottom of some pages that expalin certain details. I lent the book out to my aunt over a year ago. I'm pretty pissed she hasn't returned it yet, but I don't want to be rude and ask her. I fear she might have lost it. :-P


"The walls we build around us to keep sadness out also keep out the joy."

(Jim Rohn)
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Posted: 16 Dec 06, 22:35 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

I like clever and humorous books such as Bridget Jones's Diary by Helen Fielding and Skipping Christmas by John Grisham. I would be very happy if anyone has a book to recommend.

And of course, Harry Potter. I stayed up all night reading those books.

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Posted: 17 Dec 06, 07:27 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

to kill a mockingbird
catcher in the rye
a million little pieces
the series of unfortunate events
the hound of the baskervilles


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Posted: 17 Dec 06, 08:28 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

perhaps we need to rename this place

tokillamockingbird.com


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Posted: 17 Dec 06, 11:21 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

Hitch Hiker's Guide To The Galaxy (all 5) - Douglas Adams

Aldous Huxley - Brave New World

George Orwell - 1984


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Posted: 17 Dec 06, 16:01 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

I like very much Hesse's and Dostoyevski's oeuvres... My two 'most' favourite books are 'The Idiot' by Dostoyevski and 'Steppenwolf' by Hesse. An interesting fact is that Hesse named Dostoyevski as one of his most important influences.
George Orwell is also an interesting writer... Generally I guess I like classic/modern classic writers like Stefan Zweig, Franz Kafka (with his surreal symbolism), Charles Dickens, Rainer Maria Rilke (who wrote not only poems;-)), Leo Tolstoi, philosophical novels like 'Utopia' by Thomas More, etc. Though I have to say that we read at school a pretty modern novel (from the 50s or so) by Daniel Keynes entitled 'Flowers For Algernon' and I liked it, but it reminded me a lot of Dostoyevski's Idiot...:)

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Posted: 17 Dec 06, 16:08 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

<b><font color=B22222>daria wrote:

I like very much Hesse's and Dostoyevski's oeuvres... My two 'most' favourite books are 'The Idiot' by Dostoyevski and 'Steppenwolf' by Hesse. An interesting fact is that Hesse named Dostoyevski as one of his most important influences.
George Orwell is also an interesting writer... Generally I guess I like classic/modern classic writers like Stefan Zweig, Franz Kafka (with his surreal symbolism), Charles Dickens, Rainer Maria Rilke (who wrote not only poems;-)), Leo Tolstoi, philosophical novels like 'Utopia' by Thomas More, etc. Though I have to say that we read at school a pretty modern novel (from the 50s or so) by Daniel Keynes entitled 'Flowers For Algernon' and I liked it, but it reminded me a lot of Dostoyevski's Idiot...:)


must admit that apart from orwell and dickens ive never heard of the others you mention


isnt innuendo an italian suppository?

im gonna ride the wild wind!

its_a_hard_life wrote:you nutcase you rule!

joxer replies: but in a nice way :-]

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Posted: 17 Dec 06, 16:15 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

<b><font color=B22222>daria wrote:

I like very much Hesse's and Dostoyevski's oeuvres... My two 'most' favourite books are 'The Idiot' by Dostoyevski and 'Steppenwolf' by Hesse. An interesting fact is that Hesse named Dostoyevski as one of his most important influences.
George Orwell is also an interesting writer... Generally I guess I like classic/modern classic writers like Stefan Zweig, Franz Kafka (with his surreal symbolism), Charles Dickens, Rainer Maria Rilke (who wrote not only poems;-)), Leo Tolstoi, philosophical novels like 'Utopia' by Thomas More, etc. Though I have to say that we read at school a pretty modern novel (from the 50s or so) by Daniel Keynes entitled 'Flowers For Algernon' and I liked it, but it reminded me a lot of Dostoyevski's Idiot...:)


Kafka is a god! 'Der Prozess' is one of the best works I've ever read. Herman Hesse has the rare gift of a storyteller and a poet combined; something I've only ever seen in him, John Steinbeck and Dylan Thomas. Dostoyevski is pretty much the only Russian author I actually enjoy reading.


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Posted: 17 Dec 06, 16:19 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

joxerthemighty wrote:

<b><font color=B22222>daria wrote:

I like very much Hesse's and Dostoyevski's oeuvres... My two 'most' favourite books are 'The Idiot' by Dostoyevski and 'Steppenwolf' by Hesse. An interesting fact is that Hesse named Dostoyevski as one of his most important influences.
George Orwell is also an interesting writer... Generally I guess I like classic/modern classic writers like Stefan Zweig, Franz Kafka (with his surreal symbolism), Charles Dickens, Rainer Maria Rilke (who wrote not only poems;-)), Leo Tolstoi, philosophical novels like 'Utopia' by Thomas More, etc. Though I have to say that we read at school a pretty modern novel (from the 50s or so) by Daniel Keynes entitled 'Flowers For Algernon' and I liked it, but it reminded me a lot of Dostoyevski's Idiot...:)


must admit that apart from orwell and dickens ive never heard of the others you mention



That's very sad, because Hermann Hesse, Stefan Zweig, Frank Kafka, Thomas Mann, Rainer Maria Rilke are nearly as famous as Goethe in German literature... The same with Dostoyevski: he is claimed to be the GREATEST Russian writer of all time (naturally along with Pushkin and Leo Tolstoi) - you can actually compare him to Shakespeare's legacy in England/UK. But I agree that's a very weak point in schools nowadays: In Austria, where I went to school we ONLY learned about German and Austrian writers and only a very little bit about the most important English and French writers (and NOTHING about great Russian literature); so I had to explore all the other writers on my own...

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Posted: 17 Dec 06, 17:06 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

<b><font color=B22222>daria wrote:

joxerthemighty wrote:

<b><font color=B22222>daria wrote:

I like very much Hesse's and Dostoyevski's oeuvres... My two 'most' favourite books are 'The Idiot' by Dostoyevski and 'Steppenwolf' by Hesse. An interesting fact is that Hesse named Dostoyevski as one of his most important influences.
George Orwell is also an interesting writer... Generally I guess I like classic/modern classic writers like Stefan Zweig, Franz Kafka (with his surreal symbolism), Charles Dickens, Rainer Maria Rilke (who wrote not only poems;-)), Leo Tolstoi, philosophical novels like 'Utopia' by Thomas More, etc. Though I have to say that we read at school a pretty modern novel (from the 50s or so) by Daniel Keynes entitled 'Flowers For Algernon' and I liked it, but it reminded me a lot of Dostoyevski's Idiot...:)


must admit that apart from orwell and dickens ive never heard of the others you mention



That's very sad, because Hermann Hesse, Stefan Zweig, Frank Kafka, Thomas Mann, Rainer Maria Rilke are nearly as famous as Goethe in German literature... The same with Dostoyevski: he is claimed to be the GREATEST Russian writer of all time (naturally along with Pushkin and Leo Tolstoi) - you can actually compare him to Shakespeare's legacy in England/UK. But I agree that's a very weak point in schools nowadays: In Austria, where I went to school we ONLY learned about German and Austrian writers and only a very little bit about the most important English and French writers (and NOTHING about great Russian literature); so I had to explore all the other writers on my own...


so which one would you recommend first for a complete novice like myself?


isnt innuendo an italian suppository?

im gonna ride the wild wind!

its_a_hard_life wrote:you nutcase you rule!

joxer replies: but in a nice way :-]

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Posted: 17 Dec 06, 17:40 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

It depends on your taste and interests really ;-) Well, Dostoyevski is a very versatile writer, but he has a psychological approach - oh yeah and most of his books are REALLY THICK xD. Back to the topic: Hesse is in my opinion a good writer to start - try 'Steppenwolf' - in the 60s and 70s it was very popular amongst the young people in America and maybe also in UK ... Kafka is probably also a good one to start, especially 'Die Verwandlung' (don't know what the English title of it is; probably something with 'Transformation' since 'Verwandlung' means transformation:)) In general, there are lot of good German writers - I would suggest you really to pick a widely-known classic and read it:), but of the Russians 'beware' (LOL) - I think for non-Russians there may occur some hurting points or misunderstandings concerning culture, way of thinking/mentality (I am Ukrainian and Russian is my 2nd mother language so it is easy for me to understand my folks :D), and I can tell you that classic Russian literature deals mostly with complicated stuff like revolution, politics, war (f. ex. in Leo Tolsoi's 'War and Peace'/'Woyna i mir') or personal fate/trauma (in Dosoyevski's 'Idiot'), so as a start I would recommend you 'easier' Russian writers like Tshehov, Pushkin (although he is a classic writer, he wrote in an easy language - though I sadly don't know how the English translation sounds, because I read the 'stuff' in original language...)... Phew, I think that's all apart of one thing: Generally, I would just recommend you to browse really for the (as said before) widely-known, classic, 'renowned' literature and then you can pick what you like... Oh yeah, and I'd like to ask you: What can you recommend me in the fields of English literature, because I don't live in UK (though I love your country:)) and I'd like to find out more about its literature.

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Posted: 17 Dec 06, 17:55 Edit this post Reply to this post Reply with Quote

thanks.that was very useful.i will have a look tomorrow for steppenwolf while in penzance and let you know how i get on with it.to answer your question,i wouldnt know where to start on the type of english literature you seek,sorry,hopefully,someone else will be more enlighting for you than myself.


isnt innuendo an italian suppository?

im gonna ride the wild wind!

its_a_hard_life wrote:you nutcase you rule!

joxer replies: but in a nice way :-]